beckswithspecks:


Emma hasn’t actually worn a costume in two years; she just uses her telepathy to make people think she is, when in actual fact she just runs around the battlefield wearing baggy PJs. She learnt the trick from Charles, who hasn’t worn clothes at all for the last decade using the same method.

#IM LAUGHING BECAUSE MAGNETO IN HIS HELMET LIKE#SWEATS PROFUSELY (orchidbreezefc)

beckswithspecks:

Emma hasn’t actually worn a costume in two years; she just uses her telepathy to make people think she is, when in actual fact she just runs around the battlefield wearing baggy PJs. She learnt the trick from Charles, who hasn’t worn clothes at all for the last decade using the same method.

 (orchidbreezefc)


hello are you a ufo

hello are you a ufo

brofisting:

A Long Winter (35733 words) by WhatAreFears, dropdeaddream [AO3]

Fandom: Captain America (Movies), The Avengers (Marvel Movies)
Rating: M
Relationships: James “Bucky” Barnes/Steve Rogers, Peggy Carter/Steve Rogers
Summary: In 1945, Steve Rogers jumps from a nosediving plane and swims through miles of Arctic Ocean to a frozen shore. In 1947, Steve Rogers marries Peggy Carter. In 1966, the New York Times finds the lost letters of Sergeant James Buchanan Barnes.

Hey, do you like howling in pain? Tearing up over fictional super soldiers and super spys who may or may not kiss each other a lot? Well, bro, have I got a story for you.

Got this in the general mail at work. No strange smell or white powder or such, so not worried on that front. But what the hell is going on here? Is he saying we live on a continent made of cats? Cats made maps? The Ancient Egyptians made a vague cat map statue?

"

Unlike Godzilla, Pacific Rim doesn’t try to be serious even when it’s being serious. Characters have names like Stacker Pentecost and Hercules Hansen. The film requires you to believe that the best way to battle a giant monster is to build an even larger robot to fight that monster.

Much of the Act 2 drama derives from inter-pilot tension airlifted from the Val Kilmer scenes in Top Gun. It’s the polar opposite of the Godzilla school of drama, where everyone is a total professional who has absolutely no personal goal besides Saving The World. In Pacific Rim, Idris Elba is Rinko Kikuchi’s Obi-Wan Kenobi, and two of the last Giant Robot-pilots in the world frequently get into sneering fights over who’s the bigger badass, and Charlie Day is a scientist.

So, for all these reasons, Pacific Rim is a movie that I’ve heard perfectly smart people describe as “stupid” or “silly.” The problem with this line of thinking is that, really, that every blockbuster is pretty “silly,” in the context of Things Adults Should Care About. Godzilla is not less stupid than Pacific Rim just because people frown more. […]

The difference, I think, is that Pacific Rim glories in its own silliness. There’s a flashback scene where Idris Elba rescues a little girl, and when he emerges from his giant robot, the sun shines upon him like he’s the catharsis in a biblical epic. There’s a moment when one giant robot swings an oil tanker like a sword. Then it grows a sword out of its wrist. Then it falls from space to earth.

There are real complaints to make about Pacific Rim, I guess, all of them fair and most of them pedantic. I know a lot of people who have issues with the story. (“Why didn’t they use the wrist-sword earlier?” is a popular one.) Conversely, I don’t really know anyone who minds the story in Godzilla, possibly because everything stupid that happens is prefaced by Frowning Watanabe saying “This is why the stupid thing that’s about to happen makes sense.” Godzilla wants so badly to make sense. Pacific Rim wants so badly for Ron Perlman to wear golden shoes.

"
Darren Franich, “Entertainment Geekly: A call for an end to serious blockbusters” (via rahleighs)

septembriseur:

Man oh man so when I saw this something really crystallized for me. “When history did not cooperate,” Zola says, “history was changed.” Not the world, not events— history. What Hydra was changing was the story of what happened. Pierce echoes this, too: “You shaped the century.” What is a century? It’s a frame, a narrative, a story-object with a beginning and an ending. The Winter Soldier made the story what Hydra wanted it to be.

What’s blowing my mind right now is that he didn’t [just?] do this through killing certain people. Like, he didn’t do it through action, through presence. He did this through his invisibility, through absence, through lack of presence. He did it through his simultaneous alive-and-unaliveness, through ghosting. His actions had to not be his— in the double sense that they were Hydra’s, but also attributed to no one, made to look like accidents.

This type of narrative manipulation requires a coherent voice— a teller who controls the facts of the story. (This is why excavation/reconstruction of repressed voices is so vital as a process in history— it challenges that single, naturalized narrative.) This is yet another reason it’s vital that the Winter Soldier not have a voice. He must be mute, because he is the living body of that secret, other history: the murder that’s been refused the name murder, the violence that’s been denied the name violence. He has the power to shape the century— to change history— simply by speaking. By insisting on his own presence.